The New Pentel Sharp Goes Metal, But We’re Talking Stryper

The Pentel Sharp P207 (or P205 for that matter) changed the whole game: perfect weight, perfect grip, supreme sturdiness, and unassailable dependability, but unfortunately the eraser is poorly designed, its metal carriage is too small, resulting in the entire eraser mechanism having a tendency to slide inside the pencil, failing to erase, but worse: possibly cutting the paper with the exposed metal. Now, we all know that the importance of a pencil is not its eraser, generally it’s better to use a second eraser, it’s safer and, well…safer.
So, all they had to do was fix the eraser, and I’m sorry to report that the eraser on the new version has not been changed. Let me say, I may be bitter because I have been waiting, possibly a decade for them to fix the eraser. Instead, what they have done is offer us a new metallic color. So, to collectors: this is the equivalent of a “repaint.” TISK. Oh well, I still bought it, and I will use it, and if there is something I have missed I will be sure to keep you updated. Remember, the alternative is the Pentel GraphGear 500.

Go metal.

The Pentel GraphGear 800 WILL Get Your Mom’s Number.

I spent years using the trusty Pentel Sharp P207, but a couple of years ago, my favorite mechanical pencil became the Pentel GraphGear 800. The 800 has everything the P207 has, plus a more solidly mounted eraser, a raised grip where your fingers touch, and a sturdy, all-metal, tip that can withstand almost anything. I’ve used all of my GraphGear 800s until the names have rubbed off. You cannot go wrong with this pencil, I’ve spent so much time with the GraphGear 800 that we’re legally married in Kentucky.

Get the Gear.

Dusty’s Pen Reviews: The Uni-Ball Vision Needle Runs Like it Has Warrants

I’m a big fan of the Pilot Precise V5 and I picked up a few of these Vison Needles thinking that Uni-Ball might be able to take a similar setup to the V5 and offer some improvements. It’s not without question that one of my favorites will get dethroned, it generally happens every 5 years or so. Uni-Ball’s Vision Needle has a perfect size, fits great in one’s hand, and has a nice 0.7mm rollerball tip that glides fairly effortlessly, the feel on paper is similar to some of the better 0.5 or 0.7 mm rollerball pens out there: Unfortunately, the Vision Needle has an ink problem. The “waterproof,” “fade-proof” ink boasted by Uni-ball takes longer than usual to dry, still managing to smudge after a full 5 minutes of drying. The ink also tends to run and “spit” while writing or drawing, I try to elevate my hand off of the paper as much as the next guy, but there are still limits to how much active smudging I will take in a sitting. I’m afraid the running and smudging ink is enough to keep me from considering this pen one of “the greats.” Though the price was extremely reasonable, I will not be buying any more after this pack runs out.

Get “Needled” here.