12 More Night Gallery Episodes That Will Haunt Your Previously Underwhelming Nightmares

A couple of things: 1. When I say “episodes” I mean “segments,” and 2. This is a top 12, so you may have seen a couple of these on my past lists. NOW, these are the segments that are mind-warping, that grab just a bit of that “Twilight Zone energy” that says “hello, I’m written or inspired by Rod Serling” and fans are gonna want to catch this because it exhibits or exceeds the deep-thinking themes of Twilight Zone. You can catch these on Hulu or, I don’t know, there’s got to be other places (DailyMotion.com):

Midnight Never Ends

Why it will twist your mind: This is the most meta of all stories, it examines the relationship between a writer and the characters in their head. It’s a bit of a mental twist that could lead to mind-bending thoughts about just how original all of your favorite characters are, and how they find their way.

I’ll Never Leave You, Ever

Why it will twist your mind: The female lead is adulterous (an oddly common theme on Night Gallery) and rather than wait the short time for her husband to die, she turns to the black arts and turns his final days into never-ending torture. Don’t worry, she gets hers.

Brenda

Why it will twist your mind: This is the story of an outcast who doesn’t mind being an outcast, then she finds another outcast that is…not exactly human. What’s eerie is that the girl makes a love(?) pledge to always return to visit the immobilized creature and an eerie mention of being “reborn” through her, what are we watching here?!

The Caterpillar

Why it will twist your mind: this story introduces the idea that an insect could burrow into ones brain through the ear, then it carefully examines every possible way this could go even more horrible.

Little Girl Lost

Why it will twist your mind: Somewhere out there, someone has their finger on the button that could wipe us all off the map. So, what if that person loses their mind?

The Other Way Out

Why it will twist your mind: Burl Ives is seemingly the mastermind in a tale of a business man who gets in way too deep when he murders a stripper who threatens to reveal herself to his wife. The claustrophobia is real and something is so freaky about the kindly old snow man being a “Deliverence-esque” master of of a swamp house gauntlet.

Deliveries in the Rear

Why it will twist your mind: This jerk takes “holier-than-thou” to a new level when he starts buying corpses for his surgery class and ceases to care where the dead bodies come from. Whats freaky about this is the look at “ghouls” or grave robbers in turn-of -the century London.

The Cemetery

Why it will twist your mind: Roddy McDowell turns it out as a leach nephew, ready to take everything from his dying uncle. What’s freaky about this is his performance really, just slays it, I’m sorry I don’t have a more complex answer for you.

Eyes

Why it will twist your mind: Meet a surgeon forced into removing a mans eyes so a rich woman can see for six hours, but if you think it’s that easy I have a pair or corneas to sell you. The darkness resonates from “Eye of the Beholder” on Twilight Zone, as the leads bandages are unwrapped, but what’s waiting underneath is…irony!

Clean Kills and Other Trophies

Why it will twist your mind: Because this is the rare, Serling vehicle where racism actually makes it in and that means it’s gonna be hardcore, a wealthy, dying man makes his son vow to kill an animal or receive no inheritance. But the rich man doesn’t value life, human or animal, and he gets taught an awful lesson.

The Boy Who Predicted Earthquakes

Why it will twist your mind: Everyone dreams about seeing the future, but what happens when you have to report that the outlook is not that bright? Do you level with everyone? Lie? That is a lot of pressure for young Clint Howard.

Class of ’99

Why it will twist your mind: Again, racism rears it’s ugly head, along with misogyny, and all of the darkest recesses of the human mind. After we are all gone, how will the future view us?

The Waiting Room

Why it will twist your mind: Albert Salmi is a fascinating actor, so right off the bat this segment has that going for it. Buddy Ebsen is the real workhorse of the story, playing a doctor who “spit in God’s eye” saving the lives of stone cold killers.

The Sins of the Father

Why it will twist your mind: Everything about sin-eaters is creepy.

 

Trapped on a Desert Island: Besides Crushing Despair, Which Other 4 Art Supplies Do I Take With Me?

I know, I know, it’s supposed to be three items, but for the sake of depth it’s four this time. This is going to assume you have a lifetime supply of paper, make: unknown. My first choice is a loaded GraphGear800 from Pentel, it’s the only thing that’s gonna survive this island and give me everything I need to pencil a masterpiece that will take my mind off a lifetime of solitude. Second, I want a White Pearl eraser, this will be clutch, trust me. Third, I want a Pentel Sharp P205 loaded with non-photo blue lead, this is essential for layouts. Finally, I want a pen I don’t even have right now, but I can choose anything right, I want a Bic Z4, the most versatile pen I’ve come across, it’s a beast, it can do anything.

 

Thanos Snapped and Half My Ink Disappeared

Sakura Pigma Microns are some of the finest illustrating pens ever made. The ink flows perfectly and the metal tips are sturdy and precise. Some of the highest paid Illustrators in the world use Microns. I highly recommend them for any type of detailed work…wait for it…BUT, there is not a lot of ink in that formidably-sized barrel. The ink starts to run low just as you’ve acquainted yourself with them fully, once low, the brilliant metal tips drag and spit like any other pen. So, use these if you have the money to replace them on the regular, I would say once every week or two under moderate usage. I keep some of these with me, but I’m hesitant to use them at times, knowing their ink lifetime is limited.

Enter the Micronverse.

The New Pentel Sharp Goes Metal, But We’re Talking Stryper

The Pentel Sharp P207 (or P205 for that matter) changed the whole game: perfect weight, perfect grip, supreme sturdiness, and unassailable dependability, but unfortunately the eraser is poorly designed, its metal carriage is too small, resulting in the entire eraser mechanism having a tendency to slide inside the pencil, failing to erase, but worse: possibly cutting the paper with the exposed metal. Now, we all know that the importance of a pencil is not its eraser, generally it’s better to use a second eraser, it’s safer and, well…safer.
So, all they had to do was fix the eraser, and I’m sorry to report that the eraser on the new version has not been changed. Let me say, I may be bitter because I have been waiting, possibly a decade for them to fix the eraser. Instead, what they have done is offer us a new metallic color. So, to collectors: this is the equivalent of a “repaint.” TISK. Oh well, I still bought it, and I will use it, and if there is something I have missed I will be sure to keep you updated. Remember, the alternative is the Pentel GraphGear 500.

Go metal.

You Can Have My Brush Pens When You Pry Them From My Cold Grey IV Hands

I really can’t express just how much a simple set of grey Faber-Castell Pitt Pens can add to your work. It will add depth to your black and white drawings, and when pieces containing it are scanned, they can be color-shifted and maintain your hand drawn gradient. The packs contain “Cold Greys” and “Warm Greys,” which I usually alternate between judging by whether an object is inanimate or not. You can get them in “Brush” or “Soft Brush,” don’t get Soft Brush unless you have an exceptionally steady hand.

 

Take this sketch for example. It really only has one color (red), but the greys add enough depth to make it feel more “alive.”

Enter the grey area.

The Pentel Click Eraser is Not Unlike a Lethal Army Ranger

 

For most of my erasing I use a Paper Mate White Pearl eraser, but before I go full-in on erasing the graphite lead from beneath my pen marks, I use the Pentel Clic Eraser to go over all the most important areas.

The Clic Eraser is very delicate with the page, made out of a soft plastic, perfect for clearing all of the pencil marks on faces, hands, and any other intricately detailed part of your art.

While you’re at it, don’t forget to hold the edges of your paper when you erase, crumpling the page is a struggle that is real, and has caused many a casualty in my line of work. I can’t stress enough to only use white plastic erasers and never pink, the degradation of the medium itself is ten times worse with a pink eraser.

Join the Clic list.

Red Co’s Impressions Notebook is a Genetic Freak With Two Tails

To be totally candid: I’m just trying out different notebooks that cost less than Moleskine’s, the “budget alternatives” if you will. So the Red Co Impressions series clocks in around a tenner, and it’s got 240 pages, they are a good weight, but unfortunately the hardcover is not very hard at all, in fact it’s floppy.

The one I’m reviewing is the 5″x7″ version with “plain” pages, it’s extremely flexy, you won’t be running your bluetooth mouse on top of it. Other than the flaccidness, it’s an all-around strong offering for the price.

On top of being a good, utilitarian notebook, it has TWO ribbon bookmarks! This is the only model I’ve encountered so far to have this feature, it’s pretty useful if you are doing more than one project at once like…uhm…everyone.


 

I’m ready to flop.

It’s Not the Size of the Pencil, it’s the Color of the Lead

I heard Jim Lee (THE top comic artist of the last 20 years) speak long ago about non-photocopy blue pencils. You sketch in pencil, then pick out the best lines in non-photo blue and erase, only the blue lines will remain, allowing you to have a nice wire frame for your drawing that can easily be removed upon scanning. These days, you can even do it with a mechanical pencil: Like this Pentel Sharp 205 with 0.5mm non-photo blue lead.

The Pentel GraphGear 800 WILL Get Your Mom’s Number.

I spent years using the trusty Pentel Sharp P207, but a couple of years ago, my favorite mechanical pencil became the Pentel GraphGear 800. The 800 has everything the P207 has, plus a more solidly mounted eraser, a raised grip where your fingers touch, and a sturdy, all-metal, tip that can withstand almost anything. I’ve used all of my GraphGear 800s until the names have rubbed off. You cannot go wrong with this pencil, I’ve spent so much time with the GraphGear 800 that we’re legally married in Kentucky.

Get the Gear.

The Pentel P207 is Like That Sniper from Saving Private Ryan, Except in This Scenario He’s Really Old and Shoots a Cow Every Tenth Shot.

The Pentel Sharp P207 is one of the finest mechanical pencils ever made. It’s weight is perfect, the grip is optimal, the clip is removable (which I usually do), and it’s so rugged you can use it to get a rock out of your tire tread and go back to drawing without skipping a beat. With that being said, it has one fatal flaw: The eraser. I’ve been using this pencil for years and would rank it probably my second favorite mechanical pencil of all time, but it has a design flaw that’s never been fixed in its long life time. The metal sheath that holds the eraser in is too thin, causing the eraser to sink back into the pencil every time you use it. Granted: You probably should be using a plastic or gum eraser anyway, but there are always points where you can save time by not switching from the pencil in your hand. As the eraser recesses, the metal sheath is exposed, if you’re not careful, it can actually gouge and tear your paper.

So, it works perfectly until every twentieth line when you have to erase something tiny. I would give Pentel more of a break if they had improved it once in all this time, but, as it stands, I have a new favorite, which I will reveal in a future post. You could do much worse than the P207 (I still keep one with me as a backup), just be careful, and practice safe-erasing.

Click here to be Sharp.

Dusty’s Pen Reviews: The Uni-Ball Vision Needle Runs Like it Has Warrants

I’m a big fan of the Pilot Precise V5 and I picked up a few of these Vison Needles thinking that Uni-Ball might be able to take a similar setup to the V5 and offer some improvements. It’s not without question that one of my favorites will get dethroned, it generally happens every 5 years or so. Uni-Ball’s Vision Needle has a perfect size, fits great in one’s hand, and has a nice 0.7mm rollerball tip that glides fairly effortlessly, the feel on paper is similar to some of the better 0.5 or 0.7 mm rollerball pens out there: Unfortunately, the Vision Needle has an ink problem. The “waterproof,” “fade-proof” ink boasted by Uni-ball takes longer than usual to dry, still managing to smudge after a full 5 minutes of drying. The ink also tends to run and “spit” while writing or drawing, I try to elevate my hand off of the paper as much as the next guy, but there are still limits to how much active smudging I will take in a sitting. I’m afraid the running and smudging ink is enough to keep me from considering this pen one of “the greats.” Though the price was extremely reasonable, I will not be buying any more after this pack runs out.

Get “Needled” here.